Motorcycle passengers face higher head injury risks than drivers
Motorcycle passengers face higher head injury risks than drivers

Motorcycle passengers face higher head injury risks than drivers

Traumatic brain injuries are the most common type of injury suffered in motorcycle crashes across New York and the nation. This holds true regardless of whether an individual is in control of the bike or riding on the back of it. However, studies show that the risk of suffering a serious, potentially life-altering head injury in a motorcycle wreck is higher for passengers, rather than drivers, of motorcycles.

According to Reuters, a study of more than 85,000 motorcycle riders and motorcycle passengers involved in crashes revealed how likely each party is to suffer a TBI in a wreck.

How often do motorcycle drivers and passengers suffer TBIs

Research shows that motorcycle passengers suffer TBIs in about 40% of motorcycle wrecks. Drivers experience TBIs in 36% of motorcycle crashes. This is likely due at least in part to the fact that those steering and controlling motorcycles are more likely to wear helmets than their passengers riding on the back.

How often do motorcycle drivers and passengers wear helmets

Studies show that motorcycle drivers wear helmets more than 65% of the time. However, passengers only wear helmets about 57.5% of the time. Motorcycle passengers are also more likely than drivers to fly off the bike in the event of a crash because they do not have windshields in front of them or handlebars to grasp on to prevent ejection from the motorcycle.

While head injury risks are higher for motorcycle passengers than riders, both parties may be able to lower their risks of a TBI by wearing helmets every time they ride.

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